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NC State Extension

New Vegetables and Herbs for Your Garden

— Written By

Brian Barth | 3/25/2019 / Modern Farmer

Branch out this year with varieties that will bring new flavors to your table.

Looking to spice it up this year in the old vegetable patch? Plant breeders are always rolling out new varieties and reviving forgotten heirlooms that offer tantalizing tastes. Here are a few to consider.

1. Habanada pepper

Row 7 Seed Company, the new seed supplier founded by chef Dan Barber of Blue Hill Stone Barns fame, has a growing selection of never-before-seen vegetable varieties, including this twist on a famously hot pepper. It has habanero flavor without all the heat. Get it? “Nada” of the “haba”?

2. Georgia cabbage collards

This low-growing collard forms loose heads with a cabbage-like flavor. An old-fashioned hybrid that was likely once grown throughout the South, this variety was nearly lost until a man named Bobby Prevatte, who inherited seeds from his grandparents, brought it to the attention of botanists. It’s now available from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.

3. Mouse melon

While it may look like a watermelon that has been shrunk down to the size of a grape, this traditional Mexican vegetable is more closely related to cucumbers. New to North American palates, it’s suddenly a hot item at specialty seed companies. The flavor is cucumber-like but with a delightful bite — it’s often described as a cucumber that’s already been pickled.

Mouse Melon

4. Ground cherry

This unique crop looks like a cherry tomato but comes wrapped in a papery husk like a tomatillo. A relative of both vegetables, the ground cherry has a flavor that’s a cross between the two: sweet and tomatoey, with a piquant aftertaste. As a bonus, it’s not susceptible to the myriad pests and diseases that plague tomato plants.

5. Yacón

Hailing from the high Andes, this ancient vegetable has recently found its way onto American plates. It’s the tuberous root of the South American sunflower, which grows readily in North American soils. Raw yacón has a crunchy texture, with a flavor somewhere between celery and green apples. It’s often added to salads, but it can also be cooked like a sweet potato.

Continue reading Brian’s article for more vegetables.